Six years and still running!

Six years and still running!

The Reebok Ragnar Reach The Beach (RTB) Relay is one of the oldest and longest running relay races in the United States. The event begins at the Bretton Woods Ski area with the course taking teams through the White Mountains of New Hampshire, past fields, lakes, mountaintop vistas, ultimately finishing along the Atlantic coastline at Hampton Beach State Park – NH.  For the last six years, Dublin has sent mixed student/faculty teams to run the race. We believe that we are always the youngest team in the race and the only high school to compete. Despite high humidity and warm temps, Dubliners ran over 200 miles to raise money for the NH State Parks. Team Dublin School placed 26th out of 148 teams competing in the Freestyle category with a total time of 30 hours and 30 minutes. 

Two Dublin Teams Best Reach the Beach

Two Dublin Teams Best Reach the Beach

The Reebok Ragnar Reach The Beach (RTB) Relay is one of the oldest and longest running relay races in the United States. The event begins at the Bretton Woods Ski area with the course taking teams through the White Mountains of New Hampshire, past fields, lakes, mountain top vistas, ultimately finishing along the Atlantic coastline at Hampton Beach State Park – NH.  For the last six years, Dublin has sent mixed student/faculty teams to run the race.  We believe that we are always the youngest team in the race and the only high school to compete.  This year, as in most years, Dublin sent two 12 member, four van teams from the peaks to the sea.

Reach the Beach 2015

Reach the Beach 2015

This year’s Reach the Beach brought over 500 teams. Dublin’s runners—Sydney Clarke, Danny Figeueroa, Mark Franklin, Cam Harrington, Faith Lewis, Jared Lewis, Ian Stanford, and Will Stanhope, along with Ms. Holly Macy, Ms. Susie Vogel, Mr. Rodrigo Villaamil, and Dr. Joanna Smith—braved the race across New Hampshire. Ms. Holly Macy describes the thrill of the relay race in saying that she saw “eight students push themselves to new physical limits, all the while, having a blast!” She notes a particular anecdote that made all of the participants smile: one Sydney Clarke accidentally running seven extra miles—seven!