Something to Share: Brooks Johnson on Dublin School and Maple Sugaring

Something to Share: Brooks Johnson on Dublin School and Maple Sugaring

On Saturdays from as early as January and as late as April, different groups of students and faculty can be found collecting sap, tapping trees, adjusting the lines that run to the sugarbush. STEM classes have tested the maple syrup; one year, during Mind Fest, a class studied the history of maple sugaring; the school has invested in refractometers and hydrometers; many students and faculty members have been involved in the process of creating Dublin School’s maple syrup.

Amy Lowell - Imagist Poet

Amy Lowell - Imagist Poet

Outspoken and opinionated, Amy Lowell was famous for breaking boundaries. Unafraid of controversy, she lived life on her terms. Contemporaries described her as an electric amateur actress who dominated a room but who was also handicapped by her physical appearance. Short and overweight from a glandular imbalance, she was famous for smoking cigars continuously.

Raphael Pumpelly, Father of the Pumpelly Trail

Raphael Pumpelly, Father of the Pumpelly Trail

Raphael Pumpelly was an intrepid explorer and traveler who summered in Dublin from 1884 until his death in 1923. Born in 1837 in Owego, New York. Pumpelly attended common schools and graduated from Owego Academy in Owego, New York. Against his parent's objections, he decided against attending Yale University and chose to study and travel in Europe. A 1859 graduate of the Royal School of Mines in Freiburg, Germany,  he traveled extensively through the mining districts of Europe to study geology and metallurgy by direct observation. 

Abbot Thayer and the Invention of Camouflage

Abbot Thayer and the Invention of Camouflage

Abbot Thayer (1849-1921) was an American painter, generally credited for being the guiding force in the Dublin Arts Colony. His work is primarily remembered today for the angelic woman and Monadnock landscapes he painted.  An eccentric man, Thayer was prone to mood swings (he likely was bi-polar), and he sometimes destroyed his canvases or stowed them under a kitchen sink. But his eccentricity also led him to varied interests in the natural world, informed by his training in the arts.

Thomas Wentworth Higginson - Crusader and Writer

Thomas Wentworth Higginson - Crusader and Writer

Thomas Wentworth Higginson came to Dublin sometime in the 1880’s, later building a summer estate “Glimpsewood” in 1890.  Although largely forgotten today, Higginson was considered one of the great intellects of his time.  Among forty candidates in a public poll conducted by the Literary Life magazine, Higginson ranked fourth in importance by then living Americans behind only Thomas Edison, Mark Twain (who he shared a summer in Dublin with), and Andrew Carnegie. He was one of the leading advocates for change on a range of social issues. As a Unitarian minister, editor, and writer, he spoke or wrote about slavery, war, women's suffrage and rights, temperance, civil service reform, reconstruction, and countless other issues of the day.  His advocacy did not end in intellectual endeavors however.

On Dublin - Mark Twain

On Dublin - Mark Twain

From a letter written by Mark Twain on October 9, 1905.

Last January, when we were beginning to inquire about a home for this summer, I remembered that Abbot Thayer had said, three years before, that the New Hampshire highlands was a good place. He was right - it was a good place. Any place that is good for an artist in paint is good for an artist in morals and ink.

Paint, literature, science, statesmanship, history, professorship, law, morals - these are all represented here, yet crime is substantially unknown.